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range of motion

  1. Athletes' Performance Pyramid

    Having on-the-field success is the ultimate goal for all athletes. But how is that achieved? The vast majority of people focus on (1) sport specific training and/or (2) athletic abilities, such as strength and speed. Yet, there are more factors that contribute to success than just those two. We all know people with tremendous physical abilities that never achieve success on the field. I think the following graphic is a great example of the building block components that make up a successful athletic performance. Continue reading →
  2. Throwing Weighted Dogs Can Increase Velocity! Wait… What? - by Randy Sullivan

    Seems the rage these days is about these new weighted ball things and how they increase velocity. Funny… When we started using weighted balls as part of our process in 2009, in my community you would have thought I was Jack the Ripper! Naysayers unfairly blasted me privately, and publicly to the point that I finally gave in and stopped using them for a few months. I soon came to the realization that critics will be critics and accepting their slings and arrows is simply the price I must pay for the privilege of working with all the fine young men in my care. Continue reading →
  3. How to Implement Khaos Training in Your Program By: Gunnar Thompson, NASM-CPT, PES

    By now you know that unpredictable training is the missing link in the majority of performance training programs, and you know some of the tools that can help you train using this potent method which will result in a greater transfer to on the field performance. If you have not read the first and second part in this series of blogs about “Khaos Training,” I recommend you start with those first ("Khaos" Training Old But Becoming New Again, and "Khaotic Equipment" - Unpredictable Training Equipment, Part Two). For those that have read these blogs, it has probably left a question in your mind: “How can I implement this into my programs?”  These are the questions that I will answer in this post. Continue reading →
  4. "Khaotic Equipment" - Unpredictable Training Equipment Part Two, by Gunnar Thompson

    “Khaos Training,” or unpredictable training, is a key component that is often missing when developing a training program for athletes. The demand for players to adapt and make adjustments in their sport is critical for success. It is really easy for coaches to say “make an adjustment,” but the words are meaningless unless athletes have trained to thrive in a chaotic environment. Continue reading →
  5. A Different Type of Core Exercise

    Every athlete has experience with core exercises. We have all sat on a dirty gym floor and hammered out abdominal crunches. But have you ever thought about the usefulness of those crunches? I sure hope so (hint: they are worthless). In fact, studies show they don’t even help burn off fat, but I digress. Continue reading →
  6. Why Do Plateaus Occur?- Part II by Ron Wolforth

    A reminder of key points of Part I: 1) Plateaus are natural parts of EVERYONE's growth. 2) Very frequently I see solid and steady incremental growth being categorized and labeled by athletes and parents as 'disappointing' and 'discouraging' simply because the gains were 'so small'. 3) To truly be exceptional you must first learn to become discouragement proof... or at the very least... discouragement resistant. 4) At the Ranch we say... “To become great, you first must learn to enjoy the plateaus.” Continue reading →
  7. “Khaos” Training Old but Becoming New Again - By: Gunnar Thompson, NASM-CPT, PES

    Take a look around at your gym, weight room, or training facility. Do you see a squat rack? Good. What about a bench, free weights, or maybe plyometric boxes? Awesome. Maybe if you’re one of the fortunate ones, you see some resistance bands, medicine balls, or kettlebells? Terrific. This means your place for training is like 100% of the population. This can be a good thing. You have strength equipment, speed equipment, and power equipment. This sounds like it covers all the aspects in being a great athlete. However, the majority of training programs lack the single critical component in creating the ELITE athlete. This is of course being prepared for every chaotic movement involved in sports. Continue reading →
  8. New Product: TAP Khaos Ball

    Oates Specialties has a number of new products that I plan on featuring in the coming posts.  One of our newest additions is a line of products that will share the name “Khaos.”  Our line of Khaos products are uneven and/or unstable training products designed to challenge athletes during their workouts, often taking routine exercises and making them much more difficult.  And for those of you who know anything about Greek Mythology, Khaos (or Chaos) was the name of one of the Greek gods at the beginning of the universe.  Khaos was the lower atmosphere which surrounded the earth—comprised of invisible air and gloomy mist, which seems apt to name such a line of products. Continue reading →
  9. Muscle Imbalance in Athletes

    Many sports require an athlete to repeat the same motion or movement time and time again which can cause the athlete's body to become unbalanced. Whether the athlete is throwing a baseball, softball, football, shot-put, or discus, or he is swinging a bat, golf club, or tennis racket, these activities force the athlete to use the same muscles through the same range of motion numerous times. This repetitive use by the same muscle groups causes certain muscles to become much stronger than their opposing muscles and according to Mark Verstegen, founder of Athletes Performance, "About 65% of injuries come from overuse, which is repetitive use of joints that are rendered dysfunctional by muscular imbalances." Continue reading →
  10. Drills for Mobility of the Shoulder and Stability of the Elbow

    I want to end my series of articles regarding stability and mobility by talking about the last link of the kinetic chain for a pitcher (or any throwing athlete). This consists of the shoulder and elbow. All of the energy that has been built up by the movements of the delivery have accumulated from the lower half up the spine through the scapula and now require tremendous mobility of the shoulder and stability in the elbow in order for a pitcher to stay healthy. This energy that is generated is beneficial in terms of velocity on the ball but can be detrimental if the athlete is not prepared for the stress that accompanies this energy. Continue reading →

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