the strike zone

  1. The Ten Commandments of Pitching - By: Flint Wallace

    When I was a coaching in college, I held a meeting with all my pitchers the day before our first practice. The purpose of the meeting was to cover the basic housekeeping rules, such as how practices were to be conducted, how to read and follow the practice schedule, what our expectations were, to discuss the philosophy and plan for pitch utilization, and, finally, to present what came to be known as the Ten Commandments of Pitching. Like most good ideas, this was not original with me.  Rather, I learned the T.C.O.P  from Randy Mazey (now the Head Baseball Coach at West Virginia University) when we coached together at TCU. Continue reading →
  2. Executing Pitches in the Strike Zone

    It’s no secret that as a pitcher you want to be able to consistently throw all of your pitches in the strike zone. If you can throw the ball in the zone then you will be able to throw pitches out of the strike zone when needed as well. But simply telling a pitcher, “Hey, you need to be able to throw all of your pitches in the strike zone” is great advice, but it doesn’t help the pitcher actually do it. Coach Ron Wolforth likes to equate phrases such as that with this life advice, “You should marry a pretty, rich girl.” Great advice, but how the heck do you do that? Continue reading →
  3. The “3 Pitches On or Out” Pitching Philosophy

    Today, I want to discuss a mentality that seems to be a growing fad among coaches and even some parents. It is the philosophy that some coaches – specifically some high profile and well respected coaches – have adopted as the motto for their staff. It is the thought that within 3 pitches, a pitcher should either have gotten the batter out or the batter should be on base. It is known as the “3 pitches on or out” philosophy. Continue reading →

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