Guest Posts

  1. Are you evidence “based” or evidence “led” in your training? By: Gunnar Thompson, NASM-CPT, PES, CPPS

    Evidence and research can be a great thing. It is the basis for our never-ending quest for knowledge. But what if I told you relying on evidence and research could be harmful or even set you back in your training? I would venture to say most people would highly doubt such an opinion. After all, SCIENCE is ALWAYS RIGHT! I am not here to argue the validity of research, but I am here to ask if you need to be absolutely assured by scientific evidence that something is right before you place it into your training program? In my opinion, the answer to this question is no, not really. Let me explain. Continue reading →
  2. Throwing Weighted Dogs Can Increase Velocity! Wait… What? - by Randy Sullivan

    Seems the rage these days is about these new weighted ball things and how they increase velocity. Funny… When we started using weighted balls as part of our process in 2009, in my community you would have thought I was Jack the Ripper! Naysayers unfairly blasted me privately, and publicly to the point that I finally gave in and stopped using them for a few months. I soon came to the realization that critics will be critics and accepting their slings and arrows is simply the price I must pay for the privilege of working with all the fine young men in my care. Continue reading →
  3. Warning: Connection Ball Vandals Could End Your Baseball Career - by Randy Sullivan

    We get banged on a lot on the internet about our TAP connection balls. If you aren’t familiar with the connection ball, it’s pretty simple. It’s a yellow inflatable ball that has a little texture to the skin. verlanderconnectionWe use it as a tool to create feel and feed the mistake on a few different arm action inefficiencies. We blend it into a series of drills designed to elicit more efficient, powerful, and durable movement patterns. How did we start using them? Continue reading →
  4. How to Implement Khaos Training in Your Program By: Gunnar Thompson, NASM-CPT, PES

    By now you know that unpredictable training is the missing link in the majority of performance training programs, and you know some of the tools that can help you train using this potent method which will result in a greater transfer to on the field performance. If you have not read the first and second part in this series of blogs about “Khaos Training,” I recommend you start with those first ("Khaos" Training Old But Becoming New Again, and "Khaotic Equipment" - Unpredictable Training Equipment, Part Two). For those that have read these blogs, it has probably left a question in your mind: “How can I implement this into my programs?”  These are the questions that I will answer in this post. Continue reading →
  5. Denial is NOT a River in Egypt - by Ron Wolforth

    I wish I had a dime for every young athlete who complained to me about working hard and yet… is underachieving in some way… velocity, command, pain/recovery/durability, and/or consistency, etc. They are frustrated. They are discouraged. They are sad. They are melancholy. They are despondent. They are at their wits end. Coach Gary Ward referred to it as the ‘ain’t it awful’ mindset. Continue reading →
  6. Stay - By Flint Wallace

    Over my career as an athlete, coach, and teacher, I have noticed that the most successful people are the ones who STAY. I don't mean they stay where they currently are in their growth…that is definitely one thing successful people do not do. Here is what I mean by ‘they are the ones who stay’. Continue reading →
  7. "Khaotic Equipment" - Unpredictable Training Equipment Part Two, by Gunnar Thompson

    “Khaos Training,” or unpredictable training, is a key component that is often missing when developing a training program for athletes. The demand for players to adapt and make adjustments in their sport is critical for success. It is really easy for coaches to say “make an adjustment,” but the words are meaningless unless athletes have trained to thrive in a chaotic environment. Continue reading →
  8. Why Do Plateaus Occur?- Part II by Ron Wolforth

    A reminder of key points of Part I: 1) Plateaus are natural parts of EVERYONE's growth. 2) Very frequently I see solid and steady incremental growth being categorized and labeled by athletes and parents as 'disappointing' and 'discouraging' simply because the gains were 'so small'. 3) To truly be exceptional you must first learn to become discouragement proof... or at the very least... discouragement resistant. 4) At the Ranch we say... “To become great, you first must learn to enjoy the plateaus.” Continue reading →
  9. Shut It Down Or Keep Throwing? Maybe There’s an Alternative- by Randy Sullivan

    Yesterday I got a call from a minor leaguer who said he was interested in coming in for training before next season, but he was planning on going into complete shutdown mode for about 2-3 months. After I hung up, I had a penetrating thought that stopped me dead in my tracks. It was the kind of thought that makes you wonder what you’ve been thinking for all these years. Continue reading →
  10. Why Do Plateaus Occur?- Part I - by Ron Wolforth

    Whenever a young man breaks a record at the Texas Baseball Ranch, I will as a habit, make the comment... "Wow... just think, if you can improve that much every week, by the time you are X (typically I add 10 years to their current age) you'll throw it 132 mph... and that'll be a record!"   Everyone laughs. But my point is made. Big jumps in velocity or bat speed, while nice, can't be expected every single week or month. While we all know that intellectually... emotionally we just can't seem to get our head around a plateau. We just assume we must improve from yesterday and give it no more thought than that. Continue reading →

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