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Tag Archives: shoulder tube

  • Ideal World vs. Real World Arm Care By: Gunnar Thompson, NASM-CPT, PES, CPPS

    I want to provide some feedback and tips that I have learned from my time as a pitcher.  To provide a little more information about myself, I was an undersized individual with the heart and will to do whatever it took to succeed. I cannot tell you how many times I was told that I was not big enough to accomplish my dreams. But through sheer determination, I became the ace of my high school pitching staff, topped out at 92mph off the mound, and received a college scholarship from a nationally ranked junior college. I would not have had any of this success without proper arm care. I never would have thrown as hard or been able to answer the bell and take the mound each time my coach called on me without it. Proper arm care allowed me to achieve success in my baseball career.  Most people would probably agree that arm care is critical for success, but let me ask you one question. Do you have obstacles preventing you from your ideal arm care routine?

    If you answered no to this question then, like Coach Ron Wolforth often says, “you did not understand the question.”  We all face obstacles in the game of baseball, but there seems to be a lot more when it comes to things like arm care. I am convinced this is because arm care is not glorious or fancy.  After a game, everybody wants to shower and eat, and family and friends want to talk to you, just to name a few of the post-game distractions. Another obstacle is that you often need special (expensive) equipment in order to implement proper warm-up and cool down protocols. I see on Instagram the craze with cryotherapy, deep tissue massage, electrical stimulation devices, and so on. I believe each one of these devices and techniques could have a place in health and recovery. But are these expensive, time-consuming recovery techniques applicable in the REAL WORLD or only in the IDEAL WORLD? I for one believe they realistically could only be used in the IDEAL setting. Perhaps some professional facilities or a fully equipped training room would have these options at your disposal. Realistically, the majority of people do not have the space, money, or expertise to use such equipment day in and day out.

    So now what?  A typical baseball player faces many obstacles such as a lack of time and equipment, so how does one overcome these? I would like to share the way I overcame these obstacles, and how I wish I would have overcome others in the past. I believe first and foremost it is critical to realize arm care is a MUST not just something you hope or strive to do.  The next thing to combat is time. I remember times where we would be late arriving to games because of school, schedules, traffic, and other unavoidable things. So to overcome this, I would carry my glove and a weighted ball to class on game days. I felt like just holding and moving the weighted ball around would help me be loose for the game. I remember carrying my wrist weights to class, and I would perform exercises to loosen up. I would make sure that I had everything in my bag that I needed. I recommend never relying on someone else to bring something when it is this important. I would always find a quick 10 minute window to perform resistance tubing exercises. Finally, I would never pick-up a baseball without throwing weighted balls first, even if it was only a couple of throws, because it was critical for me and the health of my arm.  When I look back, I wish the Baseball Training Sock would have been around for me to use because I could have performed weighted ball throws on the bus or in class.

    All of the above occurred before the game, but after the game there are even more distractions. As I stated earlier, your teammates are ready to go eat or celebrate (if victorious) or people want to see you, which can pressure you to rush or even skip a proper cool down routine. I would do the same things I just mentioned above on the bus ride home. If we were home that day, I would perform my IDEAL cool down. I was and am a big proponent on doing what you did to warm-up to cool down as well. I do believe I would have greatly benefitted from the compression floss to enhance my recovery since I could perform it anywhere, and reap the rewards.

    Now what about equipment? I whole-heartedly believe that some equipment is needed to have a great arm care routine. The equipment that I utilized on a daily basis was resistance tubing, weighted balls, wrist weights, and exercise bands. You would never find me without this equipment. If I was still playing, I would also include the baseball training sock and the compression floss as well. If you look at the cost of these items, they are relatively inexpensive, and certainly far less expensive than some of the items I mentioned previously. One of the reasons I know how blessed I am to work for Oates Specialties LLC is because I personally used the products. They helped me in more ways than I can describe, and it did not cost my parents a fortune. That does not mean to say they did not spend a lot elsewhere, but I remember my mom and dad would let me pick one item at a time. Slowly I began to accumulate everything (including first class instruction) I needed to succeed. Fortunately, you do not need expensive tools to have a good arm care protocol. I believe you only need a few pieces of equipment and the knowledge of how to incorporate them.

    Am I saying there is not a place for the more expensive implements? Absolutely not. You can use all different types of equipment to enhance your arm care and recovery regimen. There are clearly reasons why professional teams spend a ton of money equipping their training rooms with such equipment.  I just believe they are used in an IDEAL setting, which can be attainable sometimes, but not all the time.

    In conclusion, there are numerous obstacles or hurdles that can get in the way of accomplishing your goal. To me, these obstacles were the most acute when dealing with arm care, and I just wanted to provide information on how I personally overcame them. We each have our own specific obstacles, so figure out what it is that may be preventing you from succeeding, and find a way to combat it!

    Be Unique and #BeELITE!

  • Arm Care: It's Not Sexy, But It's the Most Important

    Baseball holds a special place in our society and, because of this, there is often nostalgia associated with the game. We discuss the game's greatest players with such reverence. We talk about the game's unwritten rules, the beauty of a perfectly executed hit and run, and a knee buckling curve ball. Many of us have vivid memories connected to a certain game, team, or players. This is what makes baseball America's Pastime. But the nostalgia for the way the game was played yesteryear, has created generations of baseball people who have been unwilling to adapt--unable to see that certain things about the way baseball athletes train needed to be updated and brought to the 21st century.

    Fortunately, over the last 15 years or so, there has been a titanic shift throughout the baseball world. The baseball community has slowly, but surely, began to change its mindset with regard to training. Oates Specialties has been proud to be a part of this movement.

    Perhaps the greatest change has come with regard to the perspective of how pitchers should train and prepare to pitch. The most notable result of this paradigm shift is the proliferation of academies, coaches, and trainers who are using new training tools and movements in order to help pitchers build a bigger motor. In other words, these coaches and trainers understand that the number one way to increase velocity is to build athleticism and explosiveness in an athlete. The primary focus of this training--as applied to the throwing motion--is on the acceleration phase. This is important. We all know that a pitcher has zero shot of making it to the next level without adequate velocity. But if that pitcher can't stay healthy, it really doesn't matter how hard he throws.

    To provide an illustrative example: say you drive a Honda Accord and one day I walk up to you and give you a Ferrari. I then tell you to go as fast as possible. What I don't tell you is that the Ferrari has faulty brakes. Those brakes may or may not stop the car. Would you want to see how fast that Ferrari could go? Not if you're sane.

    The bottom line is that a Ferrari without good brakes isn't much good at all. It's a recipe for disaster. The same is true for an athlete who successfully improves the acceleration phase of his delivery without intentional and serious focus on the deceleration phase. At the end of the day, assisting an athlete in increasing his velocity isn't the most difficult task. If you help that athlete become a more explosive, athletic version of himself on the mound he will likely gain some MPHs (achieving increased velocity is more nuanced than this, but you get my point). Instead, the most difficult task is to help an athlete increase velocity AND decrease arm tenderness/soreness/pain while also improving recovery between outings. This is a very different task. Think about it: if you increase velocity you are increasing arm speed, which means your arm is having to endure a greater load and more stress placed on it. It also means your body has to bring to a stop an arm that has accelerated to a higher speed in the same amount of time/space.

    Oates Specialties prides itself in carrying the tools every throwing athlete can use to strengthen and care for the arm and improve the deceleration phase of the throwing motion. It is of such importance to us, that we have a category of products on our website entitled "Arm Care" where you will find these tools--most notably, wrist weights, the TAP Baseball Training Sock, First Responder Resistance Tubing, TAP Bell Clubs, Extreme Duty Weighted Balls, Exercise Bands, Rocket Wrap Compression Floss, and the Shoulder Tube. An athlete can, and should, train to both strengthen the arm, but also to properly learn how to decelerate through proper pronation, including how to hold this pronation for as long as possible (short answer: continue rotating over the landing leg).

    Without a healthy arm, a baseball athlete cannot take the field. And without taking the field that athlete cannot compete at his current level, much less make it to the next level. Plus, the longer it takes your arm to recover from an outing the longer it is before you can get back to training to become a better pitcher, regardless of whether the objective is to increase velocity, improve command, or sharpen your breaking ball.

    So my recommendation for each and every one of you is to take some time to assess your arm care routine. How much time do you spend improving your arm's brakes compared to the amount of time you spend on your arm's engine? My guess is that most of you are obsessed with the super charger you are busy building on your engine and haven't really thought about the status of the brake pads. Such a perspective is nothing more than short term gain with long term problems.

    Oates Specialties is here to help you with your arm care needs, so reach out to us if we can assist you in building your arm care and arm health routines.

    Until next time,

    Brian Oates

    Brian@Oatesspecialties.com

  • Ways to Improve Your Preseason Training By: Gunnar Thompson, NASM-CPT, PES, CPPS

    I want to start off by stating that I sincerely believe in hyper-personalization when it comes to athletes' training, nutrition, and recovery. While everyone has their own specific needs to improve their performance and health, it is possible to provide a general outline of what the best coaches and trainers are doing to prepare their athletes for the upcoming season. The four propositions mentioned below reflect principles I have learned from the great minds of Ron Wolforth, Randy Sullivan, Flint Wallace, Eric Cressey, Jim Smith, Joe Defranco, and Cameron Josse that should be universally utilized by all athletes.

    First, athletes should work on improving their tissue quality.  This is an immediate way to boost durability and performance. For some time, we have utilized Foam Rollers, Massage Rollers, Lacrosse Balls, and other tools to provide a Self-Myofascial Release (SMR). While there is some debate about what is actually happening when SMR is performed, it is accepted by the majority of coaches and trainers as a critical component to improving tissue quality. If you or your team do not have a foam roller, it is an inexpensive tool that will pay off immediately.

    Second, the ramp-up of workload is still something that most players and coaches miss in their preparation. I feel like this is absolutely necessary to mention as baseball season is drawing near and scrimmages/preseason games are about to be played. Randy Sullivan explains this concept well when he talks about athletes' ligaments and tendons, the places where athletes normally break down.  Randy explains that ligaments and tendons are slow to adapt to stress since the blood supply in these areas is very limited.  This is why starting small and building up is critical for athletes, and even more so for athletes who must perform overhead movements, such as throwing.  I have heard Randy recommend throwing into the Baseball Training Sock to start off a progression, as it is the least stressful way to get throws in, and it helps to develop a less stressful adaptation to build upon.

    The next thing that comes to my mind as it correlates to ramp-up is something that comes from Ron Wolforth. He believes that the MLB has it right when they start their pitchers throwing one or two innings in the first outing, and adding an inning to each appearance to create a gradual increase in workload. From these points, it easy to see why an athletes' preparation should not start with scrimmage/game number 1. It should be started well in advance and gradually built upon until the first scrimmage/game.

    Third, developing multiple warm-up routines is imperative to keep players healthy and alert for the entire season. I took this thought from Flint Wallace, who stated his athletes would have a different warm-up for every day of practice, and on game day they got to choose their warm-up. This concept also comes from the “Certified Physical Preparation Specialist” certification that was taught by Jim Smith, Joe Defranco, and Cameron Josse. During this certification, they mentioned that every athlete will show up every day with different needs.  An athlete will never be the same from day to day, hour to hour, or minute to minute. As a player or coach, it is your responsibility to progress or regress the training as needed by the individual that day, hour, and minute. This may seem like an impossible task, but if there is variability in a warm-up program the athlete has the freedom to do this without even thinking about it. Therefore, athletes and coaches should create variety in their warm-ups. Ladders, hurdles, resistance tubing, weighted balls, hip mobility, and the Shoulder Tube are all great warm up options for players. This will not only keep them healthy, but they will stay alert throughout the season. Baseball is known for repetitiveness and extended length. When you combine the two you create boredom. Do everything you can do to prevent this mental struggle that boredom creates.

    Finally, recovery is the single most overlooked portion of preparation. The majority of people still believe that when the game or practice is finished, your training for the day is over.  But the elite coaches and trainers I mentioned above actually view it as the START of preparing for tomorrow! Without recovery, it is impossible to come back the following day better prepared to train or compete. There are various methods in building a recovery protocol. I have seen the tools mentioned in the “warm-up” portion also used in recovery along with others such as the Rocket Wrap Compression Floss, Electrical Stimulation, contrast baths, and diaphragmatic breathing, to name a few.  These are all great ways to increase blood flow, and to better prepare the athlete physically and mentally for the next day's work.

    As I mentioned previously, this post is not meant to tell you exactly how and what to do. That is highly dependent on each individual and their specific needs, and a proper program should never be a one size fits all. Instead, the items listed above are things I believe players and coaches should be aware of when preparing for this season and every season. Use the concepts mentioned by the coaches and trainers above and make them your own. Develop a proper preparation protocol for you or your players and it will pay dividends.

    Be unique and #BeELITE!

  • Ice: It's Not the Answer

    It’s hard to believe, but ten years ago I was a junior in college. If you would have watched me pitch in college (or when I was in the minor leagues) you would have noticed a routine after each outing. The end of that routine was always the same: I would wrap my arm, from shoulder to forearm, with bags of ice, secured by the clear plastic wrap that athletic trainers seem to have in abundance. Looking back, I have to admit something: My name is Brian Oates, and I had an ice problem.

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  • What's Your Goal?

    One of the most common interactions I have with coaches and players goes something like this:

    “Brian, I just got home from the Texas Baseball Ranch (or bought Coach Wolforth’s DVDs) and I am at a loss as to what workouts/drills I should implement and, accordingly, what equipment to buy. Coach Wolforth uses almost all of your equipment at the Ranch (or on the DVD), but we only have a limited amount of time to implement some of the workouts/drills and I don’t know what items are best to purchase. What do you think are the most critical pieces of equipment I should get to help myself/my players? What would you buy if you were just starting out? What was most helpful to you when you were playing?”

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  • Balance Pad, Oval Balance Pad, and Balance Pod

    I wanted to take the opportunity in this post to bring to your attention a newly added section on the Oates Specialties home page. The new tab located on the left hand side of the screen is titled “Stability and Balance.” For those of you who have read some of my previous blogs you already know how critical stability and balance is to athletes. Because of the growing emphasis placed on those types of exercises we wanted to create a section with just those products that you can pick from to help increase you or your athletes’ stability and balance.

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  • Trevor Bauer "Javelin"

    For those of you who have been watching the College Baseball World Series you have most likely seen a clip of UCLA's ace pitcher Trevor Bauer and what the announcers (namely Nomar Garciaparra) are calling his Javelin. The camera's have been focusing on Bauer using the Javelin during his warm ups before the game and between innings. The "Javelin" is in fact Oates Specialties' Shoulder Tube.

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  • Arm Care and Staying Healthy

    As the end of May approaches baseball teams at all levels are reaching the critical point in their seasons. High schools are in the playoffs, colleges are having their conference tournaments and everybody is eyeing their respective championships. This is an extremely important time for pitchers to be at their peak playing conditions and is certainly a bad time for them to head to the DL with arm injuries. However, it is often at this point in time that many pitchers do end up injured, as the number of games and innings pitched mount, and the stress that accompanies the importance of each individual game increases. Even the pitchers on those teams unfortunate enough to be through with their season are often heading to summer ball to log more innings. Because arm health is probably the most important thing to a pitcher (and often a team) I want to discuss a couple of things I did while playing at the collegiate and professional levels to help keep myself healthy and able to answer the bell when it was my turn.

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  • Minor League Game and Interview

    Last Tuesday I had the opportunity to travel to Winston-Salem, North Carolina to visit with a former college teammate of mine and watch him pitch a couple of innings. I played ball with Evan Bronson at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas for three years before he was drafted in the 29th round of the 2009 draft by Evan Bronson Picthe Washington Nationals. After being drafted, Evan was sent to play for the Vermont Lake Monsters of the New York Penn League. Evan had a phenomenal season coming out of the bullpen for the Lake Monsters as he went 3-0 with a 0.55 E.R.A. in 49.1 innings making the NY Penn League All-Star team.

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